"Everything you have is yours?"
Feb
8
to Feb 10

"Everything you have is yours?"

 

Hadar Ahuvia and LABA Present:

"Everything you have is yours?"

"Everything you have is yours?" This was the question an Israeli security official asked Ahuvia when she went to renew her passport. The question resonated with her as she considers her relationship to her Israeli heritage. "Everything you have is yours?" explores the construction of Israeli identity through the performance of Israeli folk dance — with attention to gestures appropriated from Palestinian and Arab Jewish traditions. Ahuvia’s investigation also explores the double-appropriation of Israeli dance by American Christian Zionists in their own pursuit of “authenticity.” 

Performances by Hadar Ahuvia and Mor Mendel, Lili Bo Shapiro, Projections Gil Sperling, Sound Design Avi Amon, Dramaturgy Lily Bo Shapiro, Dramaturgical support Stacy Grossfield, Rowan Magee

Running Time: 60 Minutes || No Intermission

Tickets: General Admission: $20

LABA: A Laboratory for Jewish Culture is a program of the 14th Street Y that uses classic Jewish texts to inspire the creation of art, dialogue and study.  Everything I have is yours? was developed through the LABA Fellowship at the 14th Street Y.  The LABA program is supported, in part, by public funds from the NYC Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.  LABA is a program of the 14th Street Y.

 

 

 

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Choreographing Identities, Expanding Jewish Studies- Panel Discussion at Association of Jewish Studies Conference
Dec
17
12:45 PM12:45

Choreographing Identities, Expanding Jewish Studies- Panel Discussion at Association of Jewish Studies Conference

  • Marriott Marquis Washington, D.C. (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

This artist-scholar collaboration panel aims to show how performance practice and academic research contribute to an original understanding of the embodied mechanisms that regulate the formation of Jewish, Israeli, Arab, and Palestinian identities. How can dance reveal the political strategies of identity formation? How does choreography as a theoretical framework contribute to the field of Jewish Studies? How to integrate performance practice in the political and historical analysis of Jewish lives?


The participants are artists and scholars that investigate Israel/Palestine and the Jewish Diaspora through performance, literature, and politics, in academic and public discourses. Hadar Ahuvia is an Israeli-American choreographer, fellow of LABA – Laboratory for Jewish Culture. She will present EVERYTHING YOU HAVE IS YOURS?, a duet performed with dancer Mor Mender, which investigates how Israeli folk dance informed by Zionist ideology appropriates Arab culture. Ahuvia questions the core principles of Israeli nation-building and its legacy in the American Diaspora, by deconstructing folk dances by Yishuv “pioneers” and contemporary folk dance instructional videos circulating among American Jewish communities.


Melissa Melpignano, doctoral candidate in Culture & Performance at UCLA, is completing her dissertation on the conceptualization of “livability” in Israeli choreography. She will offer a choreographic analysis of Ahuvia’s performance in dialogue with the artist, and contextualize Ahuvia’s work in relation to the global premises of the construction of a Hebrew dance culture.

Shir Alon is graduating with a Ph.D. in Comparative Literature at UCLA. Her dissertation analyzes what she calls “literature of stasis” in order to reassess modernist aesthetics in 20th c. Hebrew and Arabic literary works. Through Affect Theory, Alon will illuminate how movement and bodily impassivity inform Ahuvia’s choreography, and how they manifest in contemporary discourses on Israel/Palestine.

Elazar Elhanan is Assistant Professor of Hebrew and Yiddish literatures in the Jewish Studies Program at CUNY. Starting from Ahuvia’s choreographic tactics, Prof. Elhanan will discuss how Zionist cultural politics for the definition of a Hebrew/Israeli culture impact the way American-Jewish and Israeli Diaspora relate to Israel/Palestine. The participants’ diverse backgrounds will enable a nuanced conversation on core issues in the fields of Jewish, Middle Eastern, and Dance Studies.

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"Everything you have is yours?"
Nov
18
8:00 PM20:00

"Everything you have is yours?"

$15-$20

“Everything you have is yours?” investigates the construction of Israeli identity through gestures appropriated from Palestinian and Yemeni culture. Hadar Ahuvia and Mor Mendel imitate and translate instructional videos of Israeli folk dances by Israelis and American Christian Zionist, embodying distance and proximity to Israel, Israeliness, and enacting the feedback loop through which national ideology is disseminated and sustained. In their performative mirroring of these videos, they reveal the subtext of dances, making explicit the Otherness at the kernel of Israeli identity.

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"Everything you have is yours?"
Nov
17
8:00 PM20:00

"Everything you have is yours?"

$15-$20

“Everything you have is yours?” investigates the construction of Israeli identity through gestures appropriated from Palestinian and Yemeni culture. Hadar Ahuvia and Mor Mendel imitate and translate instructional videos of Israeli folk dances by Israelis and American Christian Zionist, embodying distance and proximity to Israel, Israeliness, and enacting the feedback loop through which national ideology is disseminated and sustained. In their performative mirroring of these videos, they reveal the subtext of dances, making explicit the Otherness at the kernel of Israeli identity.

Friday only, post show conversation facilitated by Ali Rosa-Salis. 

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Israeli Folk Dance Deconstructed 
Nov
12
2:00 PM14:00

Israeli Folk Dance Deconstructed 

$15, $10 Artist/Low Income Rate

Israeli folk dances have been choreographed since the 1930s. Started by secular Ashkenazi women in Palestine, to embody Zionist ideology. Their use of European dances and the appropriation of steps from many sources- Jews of Middle Eastern origin, Hasidic communities, Druze, Palestinian Arabs- reflect the socialist aspirations and colonial tactics at Israel's formation.  While offering practitioners a sense of liberation, collective connection, and affiliation with Israel, they can also be studied to trace the contradictions and conflicts within Israeli society and in Israel-Palestine. 

We will learn dances from the cannon and read primary and secondary sources that highlight the dances' context and impact. 

Participants at all ages and levels of dance experience are welcome. 

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Israeli Folk Dance Deconstructed 
Nov
5
2:00 PM14:00

Israeli Folk Dance Deconstructed 

$15, $10 Artist/Low Income Rate

Israeli folk dances have been choreographed since the 1930s. Started by secular Ashkenazi women in Palestine, to embody Zionist ideology. Their use of European dances and the appropriation of steps from many sources- Jews of Middle Eastern origin, Hasidic communities, Druze, Palestinian Arabs- reflect the socialist aspirations and colonial tactics at Israel's formation.  While offering practitioners a sense of liberation, collective connection, and affiliation with Israel, they can also be studied to trace the contradictions and conflicts within Israeli society and in Israel-Palestine. 

We will learn dances from the cannon and read primary and secondary sources that highlight the dances' context and impact. 

Participants at all ages and levels of dance experience are welcome. 


 

View Event →
Israeli Folk Dance Deconstructed 
Oct
29
2:00 PM14:00

Israeli Folk Dance Deconstructed 

$15, $10 Artist/Low Income Rate

Israeli folk dances have been choreographed since the 1930s. Started by secular Ashkenazi women in Palestine, to embody Zionist ideology. Their use of European dances and the appropriation of steps from many sources- Jews of Middle Eastern origin, Hasidic communities, Druze, Palestinian Arabs- reflect the socialist aspirations and colonial tactics at Israel's formation.  While offering practitioners a sense of liberation, collective connection, and affiliation with Israel, they can also be studied to trace the contradictions and conflicts within Israeli society and in Israel-Palestine. 

We will learn dances from the cannon and read primary and secondary sources that highlight the dances' context and impact. 

Participants at all ages and levels of dance experience are welcome.

 

View Event →